Tutorial reflection 1

[Reading Response: Ackbar Abbas AND/ OR Giuliano Bruno] During the first two lectures, I have learned how an architecture plays important role in film. It have several functions, but mostly it emphasizes the realism of film. The reason why those architecture such can support the realism of film is because a building indeed contains some cultural factors. For instance, one of the reading by Abbas, he mentioned some buildings that show cultural identities in Hong Kong. One of them is Flagstaff building. It was impressive personally since I actually saw it before. The appearance of building is exotic, since it

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Reading Response: Giuliano Bruno

Alfred Hitchcock’s Bomb theory, an analogy for difference between surprise and suspense, comes to my mind while reading about the relevance of ‘real time’ vs ‘reel time’ in Andy Warhol’s ‘Empire’. Much like the ticking of a bomb, ‘empire’ builds suspense over the period of 8 hours however chooses not to surprise the audience as Warhol adapts a zero degree cinematic perspective. The transformation from daytime to night-time along with subtle changes in atmosphere show how the urban environment and architecture itself is the suspense of the rhythmic filmic experience. The mundane real and the fantastical cinema reflect onto each

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Reading Response:Abbas

The architectures in the films give the first impression of the city to the audience, which is one of the most direct ways to know about the city. However, when the city is simply defined by the architecture, the history and culture which isn’t shown by the architecture may be ignored by people. HK has a very complicated social background and history, where is affected by China, its colony and its own special geographic and economic condition, resulting in three typical kinds of architectures——Placeless, Merely Local and Anonymous. In this case, the receptivity of HK is extremely high, which causes

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Reading Response: Ackbar Abbas

The famous director Wang Xiaoshuai once said that film is the gaze at time. This reading discussed the relation between reel time and real time, as well as subjectivity and objectivity, where architecture means no more than a dwelling of temporality and an element of atmosphere. I am particularly interested in this topic as time is closely related to memory and dream in my opinion. George Lucas used to say that film is the art of constructing dreams. Indeed, idiosyncrasies of reel time, blunted as presenting characters’ whole life in 2 hours and sharp as focusing on slightest moments, are

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Reading Response

I think the relationship between architecture and film is the same as the role played by describing the environment when writing an essay. We can use the light and dark colors of the buildings portrayed in the film, and even the weather, etc. for the environment in the film, to maximize the role of the general tone and atmosphere of the plot that the director and screenwriter want to convey in this film. At the same time the audience has the maximum viewing experience to bring into the plot. Miao Luxing 3035917769

Reading Response:Giuliano Bruno

After reading this article, I have a deeper understanding of the definition of film. In an era of productivity and efficiency, the films made for serving audiences are often cut to speed up. The purpose of films is nailed to the tag of entertainment. However, the awakening of post-modernism inspires us; It allows the audience to contemplate or think about the passage of time off-screen by using long lenses. It was best seen in the movie ‘Empire’. The motionless Empire State Building and the changing weather conspire to render the film. The building is also filled with flowing people at

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Reading Response: Ackbar Abbas

After viewing the material by Abbas, which indicates the disappearance of Hong Kong building due to the more focus on market value while neglecting the building as a representative for the city by its cultural, historical, political background. Nowadays, in response to these phenomena, figuring out ways to preserve the iconic city is essential. Except for the multi-cultural characteristics of Hong Kong, I think the vintage building style is also a signal based on the significant audiences’ impression of HK TVB culture spreading. Specifically, the nostalgia also responds to the memory recall, as Abba mentioned, which can indicate through storyline

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Reading Response: Ackbar Abbas

Perhaps one of the most striking parallels between architecture and film is that they both reconstruct a hallucination of the bygone things. The illusory memories, like the metaphor in the architectural forms of Flagstaff House or Pei’s Bank of China Tower, are repeatedly reproduced after the real history has vanished and ironically becomes part of Hong Kong’s identity. Over twenty years ago, Abbas wrote about the disappearance of Hong Kong, or its false images through relentless urban renewal and chaotic architectural styles. Two decades on, it seems that the continuously intensifying marketization, the architectural anonymity, and even the anxiety of

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Reading Response: Ackbar Abbas

This reading have raises the thoughts of the bonding of disappearance and the architecture. In Hong Kong, a place that nostalgic with the skyscrapers with a view to provide the accommodation to a high density population. Moreover,  the city is a mixture of architecture from the western post-colonialism and the traditional Chinese style which makes Hong Kong become Muti-culture city. Yet, Ackbar Abbas mentions that some of the architecture more likely a decorative rather than a historical and sophisticated building. As day goes by, Hong Kong lost its own colour and it is hard to distinguish the building that is visualise in the

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Reading Response: Ackbar Abbas

This article with the theme of disappearance mentions a very interesting opinion, that is, cities are divided into three types: real, surreal, and simulated according to the degree of relevance to their historical context. Interestingly, with different perspectives, Hong Kong will present the characteristics of all these three different urban forms at the same time. This stemmed from the long-standing conflict and interaction between Chinese culture and western colonialism in Hong Kong, resulting in floating identity recognition. Such confusion of cultural identity has led to the absence of architecture in reflecting urban culture, as a result, Hong Kong’s historical buildings,

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