[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa

One of the points that impressed me the most in the article is how the architecture in the movie shows the social situation. For example, in the 1930s and 1940s, the United States faced a severe Great Depression, many people faced unemployment and bankruptcy due to the economic depression, which made it difficult for them to gain a sense of security in modern cities. Therefore, movies of that era (such as “The Enchanted Cottage”) can often separate people from modern cities, combine traditional happiness with traditional architecture, so it can reflect the problems brought about by fast economic development and

Continue reading[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa

Reading Response: Joseph Rosa

This article talks about the connection between modern architecture and cinema. Like movies, architectural space constructs detailed motion images, dynamic trajectories of living space and life narrative. As the meaning of modern architecture, it is inseparable from the lives of modern people. At the same time, movies come from life. Through modern architecture, movies can better narrate some more realistic and sharp topics about power, status, crime and so on. While some traditional buildings will appear in the movie, which can make people more immersive, let people watch some more empathetic experiences or events, and more in line with real

Continue readingReading Response: Joseph Rosa

[Reading Response: Joseph Rosa AND Pamela Robertson Wojcik]

In the first article, the article discusses the concerns caused by modernity in the United States about the modernity embodied in modern buildings, apartments. The villains in the film began to live in modern buildings, reflecting the American resistance to traditionalism and modernity. And in the second article, the article discusses the apartment plot in detail, illustrating the development of the apartment plot. At the same time, it proposes that, for the apartment narrative, in different time backgrounds and spatial backgrounds (different countries, regions, communities), its influence on the narrative is completely different. For example, in the United States, the

Continue reading[Reading Response: Joseph Rosa AND Pamela Robertson Wojcik]

[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa

The article mainly discusses the relationship between modern domestic architecture and film, that how modern architecture implies different characters’ personalities and actions. In the 20th century, there’s an interesting phenomenon that modernist buildings are usually connected to danger, transgression, or even crime. In contrast, the conventional accommodations usually represent traditional love and happiness. For example, in James Bond series, most criminals site their accommodations in remote, modern hide-aways. This stereotype has provided the audience an inertial way of thinking to connect modern buildings with evil plans and encouraged filmmakers to focus more on modern architecture design in films. — Li

Continue reading[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa

Reading Response: Joseph Rosa

Rosa discussed the relationship between film and modern domestic architecture from the article. It is a common thought that modern architecture is always related to negative characters. Maybe that’s because Americans never fully accept the modern house as their home, but rather as a workplace. The apartment-dweller are usually young and naive, while the penthouse is generally for single wealthy people who only care about social status. However, when the rich fall in love and get married, it is a typical development that they reallocate to a traditional house. However, traditional architecture is often associated with happiness in film. In

Continue readingReading Response: Joseph Rosa

Reading response: Joseph Rosa

In most movies that contains architecture and family definitions as a representation of character identities during the period 1930s-1990s all conducted traditional structure as warm, normal and satisfied, which shown in traditional family structure and positive character. On the other hand, the new structures, especially the apartments conduct the character as abnormal and negative, including the LGBT group, the weirdos and single elder generations. Also, during the period of wars and turmoil, the breaking of the new architecture can be witnessed int eh movies like the series of James Bond. After this period, the diversity and uncertainty are shown in

Continue readingReading response: Joseph Rosa

[Reading Response: Joseph Rosa]

From this article by Rosa, the relationship between modern domestic architecture and movies has been discussed. Upon this understanding, we could further think about the interactions in between film and architecture industries. Film makers certainly take lots of inspirations from the architects. An example that has been shown in this article is the influence of the famous modern architect John Lautner on Hollywood productions in the late 18th century. Lautner’s 1960’s creation, the Chemosphere, is a UFO like structure with circular ceiling, perimeter glass walls and middle concrete supports. The building looks fantastically futuristic on the hill side and was

Continue reading[Reading Response: Joseph Rosa]

[Reading Response: Joseph Rosa and Pamela Robertson Wojcik]

After reading Joseph Rosa Pamela Robertson Wojcik’s article, these are some of my understandings and feelings. Rosa’s article mentioned the modern and traditional styles of houses in the movies; Americans have never entirely accepted modern architecture as their home, and most Americans prefer the conventional home, whether in film creation or life. Also, there’s a big difference between living in apartments and a penthouse; people in penthouses live in the present, look to the future, and care little about the past. The article has shown that if people fall in love, get married, or have children, and they will choose

Continue reading[Reading Response: Joseph Rosa and Pamela Robertson Wojcik]

[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa and Pamela Robertson Wojcik

Both Rosa and Wojcik demonstrate the way modern domestic architecture helps to construct the film narrative and reflect the phenomenon and problems in modernism and urbanism, with a particular insight into the classical Hollywood movies in the sixties and seventies. In Rosa’s, there is a mutual dynamic between architecture and film in that “Hollywood films have both reflected and shaped American views about modern domestic design.”1 On one hand, the setting of modern dwellings presents urban life, along with technological and social developments. On the other hand, modern domestic architecture has fallen into a stereotype that arbitrarily and consistently associates

Continue reading[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa and Pamela Robertson Wojcik

[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa

In the early days, there was a fear that modern homes would have a negative impact on traditional family ties. The link between traditional architecture and traditional happiness was also emphasised in the films. The author cites several films to depict villainous characters mostly living in modern homes. The houses are also mostly built on top of the mountains, isolated from the rest of the world. The modern homes have a unique design with large expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass, concrete, minimalist interior arrangements and extensive use of cool colours. These designs make the houses look expensive but always feel cold,

Continue reading[READING RESPONSE] Joseph Rosa