[READING RESPONSE] WILLIAM M. TSUTSUI

  In my opinion, the reason why Japan’s disaster film industry is very popular is closely related to the country’s own experience and attributes. As an island country, Japan, located on the Pacific Rim seismic belt, has to experience large and small earthquakes. In the 1950s-1960s, Japanese people were recovering from the trauma of World War II. The monster films during this period well reflected the domestic situation and gave the Japanese people a way to sympathize and find ways to vent. When people watch these films, they can easily bring their tragic experience into the world, and then they

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[Reading Response: Christine Boyer]

The perspective of cyberspace from Boyer’s text interested me most, stating that virtual space “deconstruct rather than to duplicate” physical reality. I strongly agree with this because the space created by technology will never be as fulfilling as physical space do. As Boyer also mentioned, cyberspace provides “annihilation of space and time,” I believe space always goes with time. There is a change that only time can give to the space. It can be derived from people’s hands-on experience of living. Therefore, if technological development goes over the speed of people adapting the right way of utilizing the advancement, the

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[Reading Response: Carl Abbott]

In Science fictions, cities are always migratory. In contrast to Le Corbusier’s proposals for building high rise buildings in fixed placed, migratory cities are movable and flexible, which means they do not have a fixed location. For example, in fiction Armada, cities are built on ships that are connected together and floating on the water. This scenery reminds me of the rising sea level nowadays due to global warming, which has threatened some low-level cities and small islands to vanish from the ground level. This is the issue that our many countries across the world have been working on, developed

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[Reading Response: Carl Abbott]

In our past few lecture, we have learned about sci-fi techno spaces and monsters in films. It was impressive to discuss about different format of city within scientific technology. Especially, in the reading, it explains about moving city. Before, I read the reading, it was personally believed that space or place cannot be moved. However, as what film ‘Snowspiercer’ presents, there is a moving city. It shares same function of city, but literally it is moving by using the train in the film. Not only this movie, in the films, there are various forms of city via scientific technology. Also,

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Reading Response: Carl Abbott

The first text by author Carl Abott introduces the concept of ‘migratory cities’ supplemented by examples and comprehensive analysis of media from the science-fiction genre. He introduces examples such as Armada, which is a city consisting of a flotilla of ships together, Snowpiercer, life on a perpetually moving train in a world wrought by natural disaster, and the constantly moving, grinding Earth in the novel Inverted World etc. He shifts the perspective of cities being natural confluence of people congregating at an area for their livelihood from the perspective of a technocrat, to a living, breathing, moving machine.  Through the

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[Reading Response: Carl Abbott]

In science fiction movies and novels, ‘migratory’ cities are often built on the basis of real immigrant cities like NewYork. These stories are often set in a post-disaster context, and due to issues such as resource scarcity, people often build cities in a mobile way to seek resources or avoid disasters. Therefore, stories in such a wasteland worldview tend to revolve around survival, and because of the frequent wars between people for resources, such films often bring out discussions of human nature and future. In the films “Mortal engine” and “Snow piercer”, both stories are based on moving cities, but

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[Reading Response: Carl Abbott]

As the human population grows, we can imagine an increasingly urban society. Shifting weather patterns, rising sea levels, reduced access to resources, and a host of other issues will radically impact urban environments, while technology holds out the dream of cities beyond Earth. For science fiction, cities can be mobile. That is the premise of a stunning reversal. The benefits about walking cities that when a city gets too polluted or its local policies too oppressive, its residents can decide to pack up and move the whole city out. Residents don’t have to leave their apartments because the whole city

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[Reading Response: Christine Boyer]

The application of advanced technology has become trendy nowadays. M. Christine reminds me of several humanistic and ethical issues during the booming development of cybercities. For example, does it a long-term achievable idea to construct such a virtual city? It’s widely agreed that a house is a machine for living in’(Le Corbusier), human beings use various artificial intelligence to functionalize our city into better services and comfortable places based on some basic principles. For example, traditional cities contain basic elements such as distance and time. However, Cyber cities turn those elements into an imaginary matrix of computer nets and electronic

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Reading Response: Carl Abbott

In this article, Carl Abbott describes ‘migration cities’ in science fiction and evaluates how architecture influences futuristic environments. The ‘migration city’ is mobile and not tied to the earth anymore. The formation of these cities is often due to some vast disasters that destroy the living environment of human beings, and they have to flee. Whether the essence of these mobile cities is trains, ships, or other forms, the core is mobility. Cities need to be constantly moving to find the resources for survival. Although these cities are just a fantasy in a science fiction world, they also reflect contradictions

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Reading Response: Carl Abbott

Carl Abbott talked about imaginary cities in science fiction films. The reason for creating these imaginary cities is because of issues like resource scarcity, environmental degradation, etc. For survival, the residents living in these cities had to develop a new form of a place to live, which the author refers to as “migratory cities.” These cities have the power for actions such as the ability to walk and even fly. These movies are a reflection of the modern social world and social problems, such as the failure of resource allocation. The film also depicts the differences between people of different

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